was successfully added to your cart.

Interesting Narrow Format

By | Other Presses & Other Rooms, Thoughts
Iperborea Italian Norwegian Book Format It’s been interesting scanning bookstores in Milan. The covers are generally more sedate than trends in US book covers. One thing I very much liked were these skinny paperbacks. They measure 4″ x 7.75″ and for certain types of poetry or prose poems, could be very eye-cathing and fun. I picked this book up at Tempo Ritrovato Libri in Milan, which is a very nice bookstore specializing in Small Press books.
Publisher of this translation is Iperborea Casa Editrice.

Visiting our Distributor, SPD

By | Thoughts
Taking a much needed day off after three book launches in three different cities, we hoped on the BART and went to yet another city! Ha! All I can say is I forget how hot and lovely it can be in San Francisco in October, when the weather has turned toward winter in Seattle. We had a nice chat with Brent, Laura, and met the whole gang that has been helping us come up to speed with having a distributor. We did not get to see where our books FLY OFF THE SHELVES and into the hands of readers, but recognize some places are just better left to ones imagination. We did see endless shelves of small press books tended with care by this so important non-profit. Our literary scene would be so diminished without them. THANKS! Small Press Distribution: you can order books directly from them.

Visiting SPD! Brent and Laura with the Entre Ríos team!

Book Launch for Mary’s Dust

By | Thoughts
We were pleased to once again be hosted by the Seattle Academy for Arts and Sciences for the book launch for Mary’s Dust, new poems by Melinda Mueller and music by Lori Goldston. We also premiered the new film by Christian Anderson about the book! SEE IT HERE. This space is definitely my favorite in town for holding a reading and a party! Perfect space downstairs, nice mixing space upstairs! Thanks for everyone who came out in the blustery, terrible weather. What a stormy night!

Spokane! Book Launch for Alchemy for Cells & Other Beasts

By | Thoughts
We had our first book event out of Seattle! A fantastic evening with Maya Jewell Zeller and Carrie DeBacker with special musical guest Liz Rognes. The Bartlett is a fantastic space in Spokane and the folks their easy to work with and great problem-solvers when it came to our film we wanted to show. It could not have gone better! So thanks! And thanks to all the listeners and readers in Spokane that came out for the show.

First Lit Press Mention…

By | Thoughts
Now we were excited that our first “review” was in a school paper because that is awesome… but it is a delight to also get our first mention in a dedicated lit site.  Thanks to Denise Hill at New Pages for finding our combination of including audio with all of our books an interesting approach. I always learn something new about a poem when I hear an author read it and it is our hope that by including audio with our books, you will too! Read the full blurb here. On our 2017 books, you’ll find a simple password in the back of the book, which you can enter on our site to access the download file. For our early books, you can download those without a password.  Take a listen here. You can also listen to samples on our SoundCloud page (though rumor is they are running out of money and may close down soon!). LISTEN TO SOUNDCLOUD.

Our First Anniversary!

By | Learning How to Be a Publisher, Thoughts
Poetry Entre Rios Books Seattle

A year ago today, we received our first check!

I keep saying being a book publisher is the second hardest thing I’ve tried— right after marriage. But even that would be close. Does it get easier? I hope so! At least, I am looking into project management software to create fancy charts that might help me feel better about the many interlocking pieces. My creative brain really struggles with some of the essential pieces of being a publisher: budgets, time lines, cash flow, cash, budgets, spreadsheets, budgets, forecasting, cash. Here’s what we’ve accomplished:
  • We have published three beautiful books, all very unique. We’re heading into the sweet spot we want to be at with poetry in collaboration.
  • I’m getting sharper on book design issues, paper choices and understanding budgets, but we’re definitely still not even close to getting our books at a decent production cost.
  • We’ve had a few stellar events and are looking forward to hosting some more!
  • We’ve lined up an exciting group of project for 2017 and am learning why lead times are so long…we’re actually pretty sure we have our 2018 work lined up now.


  • Here’s what we’ve not even gotten close to:

  • We’re still building a community around our books and press. This is going to be key to success.
  • We’re still lacking a distributor and are not ready to go national, whatever that is going to mean.
  • I’m still learning confidence to say, “Yes, we publish poetry and BUY a book.” The making of books easy. The being in love with your collaborators and believing strongly in their work, no problem. The walking up to complete strangers or, even worse, booksellers and asking them to carry our books, OH DREAD AND FEAR BEYOND BELIEF!


  • People keep asking me, Do you enjoy being a book publisher? and the truth is, I am not sure. What I enjoy is having my brain taxed every single day with something new to learn. I love working with so many talented people. I like bringing that vision to life. But with so many difficult pieces, I can’t say “joy” is the emotion I feel. A steely resolve seems somehow a more fitting emotion for the upcoming year. That, and a bit of pride.

    Winners for Claudia Rankine drawing!

    By | Thoughts
    xzgke5opnb0kWe are thrilled to announce our drawing for the Claudia Rankine reading! Congratulations to Melissa who wins our two tickets to see Ms. Rankine on Friday night. Further congratulations to Whitney and Dan who will both receive a copy of our latest book, “Popular Songs: The Political Poems of 1819-1820″.

    Why We Publish Collaborations

    By | Thoughts
    Fifteen years ago, as a young(er) poet, I got it into my head that I could not longer read my poems aloud unless I had a gigantic video behind me. This was all well and good, and slowly with some support from 911 Media Arts Center, I had some help making this a reality. I also, as they say, painted myself into a box, because I did not know how to to collaborate, raise money, or promote this kind of work. Poetry is the collaboration with the world. While much of its difficult work might take place within the romanticized solitude of the author’s desk, the ability to get the work read, heard and most importantly, to occupy our shared sphere of being human, requires collaboration. Of course, there are many well-known combinations of poets, painters and musicians responding to each other’s work, not to mention that most stubborn collaboration, the translation!  It is impossible to imagine the New York School without the painters, the Harlem Renaissance without the musicians, the Romantics without the radical press! Even our most lonely of poets, Emily Dickinson had her windows and letter campaigns. Why is the market place so determined to present work solo. Why do we feel the need to believe that the creativity of the poet or the artist happens in isolation rather than inherently as part of a community? A community that exists not only between people expressing themselves creatively in response to the world, but the community that supports the individual artist with the mundane. Sometimes it’s nice for someone else to put on the coffee when there’s writing to be done! In our mind, the ability to collaborate is truly the unsung skill of all successful poets and artists. As poetry press, we have the good fortune to have our financial goal be,  “Let’s just not lose a lot of money.” (see our statement on Financial Transparency here). With that goal, we’re able to put out work in formats that financially make no sense for a press that has to pay staff salaries and support a bigger marketing efforts and other complications. It means we put out fewer books, but that we can put out books that give our poets and artists more creative freedom and the opportunity to very publicly engage with each other. It means that we can work closely with local presses to run the work, rather than sending the books to China to get printed. It means that we have a responsibility to put out work that otherwise would be too difficult to find a home for in the market as it exists.