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Melinda Mueller and Lori Goldston at Elliot Bay Books

By | Thoughts

It was a real treat tonight to once again get Melinda and Lori together to read and perform from Mary’s Dust. Thanks to Elliot Bay Books for hosting this event!

Quite an opener!

Melinda Mueller and Lori Goldston at Elliot Bay Books

Melinda Mueller and Lori Goldston

Lori Goldston playing “Songs for Mary’s Dust”

Melinda Mueller signing books

Hear Melinda Mueller on KUOW

By | Reviews

Elizabeth Austen discussed the new book by Melinda Mueller, Mary’s Dust, with Bill Radke on the Noon Hour.

They discuss the poem, “Covert Arts”, about three different Marys in the Civil War and how the women in the poem overcome the constraints of their time and are both seen and unseen.

Listen to the ten minute segment on KUOW. This poem is so fierce.

Interesting Narrow Format

By | Other Presses & Other Rooms, Thoughts

Iperborea Italian Norwegian Book Format

It’s been interesting scanning bookstores in Milan. The covers are generally more sedate than trends in US book covers. One thing I very much liked were these skinny paperbacks. They measure 4″ x 7.75″ and for certain types of poetry or prose poems, could be very eye-cathing and fun.

I picked this book up at Tempo Ritrovato Libri in Milan, which is a very nice bookstore specializing in Small Press books.

Publisher of this translation is Iperborea Casa Editrice.

Maya Jewell Zeller & Ellen Welcker at Open Books!

By | Readings

Thanks to everyone that came out for our first reading of Alchemy for Cells & Other Beasts in Seattle. And hurrah for Ellen Welcker joining in…her newest book was slightly delayed, you will want to find it at Open Books early next year.

One of the bonuses of last night was that we got to finally meet Rebecca Starkey, our first Emerging Visions Filmmaker Award winner. See her film HERE.

Photo of everyone by Gabrielle Bates of Open Books.

Ellen Welcker, Maya Jewell Zeller, Carrie DeBacker, Rebecca Starkey at Open Books

Short Run!

By | Fests and Book Events

We were at our first Short Run as an exhibitor (and sponsor, too).

Wow. It is a very different experience sitting on that side of the table. Next year, I must take helpers as I got to see so little of the rest of the show and it’s always inspiring— so much talent and dreams crammed in Fisher Pavilion!

Only picked up a few books— but notable was this sweet collection of plays by Two Plums Press. Their books are tiny, tiny type— but so interesting and oddball. I LOVE THEM. Go, Portland Presses, go!

Aaron Shurin at Open Books

By | Readings

It’s not every day that one gets to introduce their first poetry crush. The truth is I started to tear up in my rambling introduction to Aaron Shurin!

It has been such a great honor to publish his work.

Thanks to Alex Vigue, who just had his first chapbook, The Myth of Man, published by our friends at Floating Bridge Press for opening the evening. And, of course, Open Books for being a fantastic host.

Aaron Shurin at Open Books

Recommended reading from Aaron Shurin (except that Clare is well, my own issue).

“Flowers & Sky”: An SPD Staff Pick

By | Reviews

We were honored to have Flowers & Sky: Two Talks be one of the SPD Staff picks this month. That means it’s 20% off all month long.

In FLOWERS & SKY: TWO TALKS Aaron Shurin deftly uses its eponymous subject matters to consider the poetics of a whole life, following out the flowers and skies in his actual experience, as well as the appearance of these words in his work. The talks are excellent examples of the lyric essay, a form that allows the writer the latitude to make prose sense in a poetic way. One of the advantages of the form, fully exploited by Shurin, is the opportunity to use wonderfully sounded language to make incantatory as well as logical sense. A danger can be the risk of being self-indulgently vague. Far from falling prey to this danger, this book is precise and rigorous in its examination of a writing practice and a series of lived incidents that both inspire and comprise that practice. As revelatory as they are expository, these talks, along with the poems and other material in the book, allow Shurin to celebrate (and demonstrate) his poetics with an honest zeal that seems to tell all. Who better, I thought reading and rereading the book, to fully present one’s poetics than oneself? This work is like a textbook of how to write about one’s poetics in a way that is serious, accurate, and engaging. Old poets thinking to write their memoirs and young ones to assert their own poetics should take notice. -Laura Moriarty