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Collaboration Archives — Entre Rios Books

Rebecca Starkey Receives Emerging Visions Filmmaker Award

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Rebecca Starkey FilmmakerWe are very pleased to announce the receipient of our first Emerging Visions Filmmaker Award is Rebecca Starkey.

Rebecca Starkey is an aspiring cinematographer and will be graduating in June from the film program at Central Washington University. Rebecca was recently awarded first place in the student narrative film category in the Broadcast Education Association’s festival of media arts for her short film Todd’s Vlog. When she is not behind the camera Rebecca can usually be found rock climbing or painting.

Rebecca will be working on a short film with Spokane poet, Maya Jewell Zeller and Seattle artist, Carrie DeBacker for their forthcoming (September 2017) collaboration, Alchemy for Cells and Other Beasts.

Our Emerging Visions Filmmaking Award is meant to encourage the growth and development of women artists and technicians traditionally underrepresented in the film and digital industry. This award comes with a $500 stipend. With this award, we seek to foster connections between these emerging creators and the artist and writers working on our books in ways that build confidence, skills and provide a realistic glimpse in how working artists create and collaborate (and have day jobs).

We are thrilled to welcome Rebecca to our team of poets, artists and musicians and look forward to sharing her work this fall. We would also like to thank the many women who applied and sent us clips and ideas to consider. We’ll be posting information a bit earlier (as in later this fall) for our 2018 Emerging Visions Award… which will focus next year on translation. Keep up-to-date on that by following us on Facebook.

Fall Book Preview: Mary’s Dust

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Over the next few weeks, we will be sharing details of our upcoming fall books.

Our first book we would like to share with you is a new full-length collection by Melinda Mueller, Mary’s Dust. This book contains thirty-two poems on different Marys through history. Using a wide variety of inventive and traditional forms, it is a meditation on exposure and concealment, pleasure and pain, and of course, language, as women create their own identities on their own terms. It’s a great honor to bring out a second book by one of Seattle’s most intriguing writers.

We’ll be presenting this book with an audio download that includes music specifically commissioned for the book by Seattle genius (yeah, that is what the Stranger says and we agree), Lori Goldston. This new composition will premiere on February 23 at the Chapel Performance Space and is being recorded live, so you too could join us that evening and be part of Mary’s Dust.

Here’s one of the shorter poems in the book:

RADIUM
Marya Salomee Sklowdowka: b. 7 Nov 1867 – d. 4 July 1934

As, in her native Poland, the ember-colored
fox ignites the stubble field it streaks across,
ignites even the noonday dusk of the forest floor.

As, toddling into her parents’ long-ago garden
after dark, and crouching beside a lantern there,
she cried out: Look. The ants. They have shadows.

As religionists rummaged in the body for its soul,
that ant-shadow, which might “be shown on an X-ray
plate as a lighter spot on the darker shadow of the bone.”

So she fractionates the soul of pitchblende,
and having pent it in a glass vial, gazes into
its blue dazzle. And it gazes into her, being

the abyss Nietzsche warned of. And ransacks her.
And ignites her bones to ash. Heaven doth with us as we
with torches do. Nor will she lift from it her hands.

Karinna Gomez: Artist Reception

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Meet Alaskan Artist, Karinna Gomez, as we celebrate the release of The After, a poem by Melinda Mueller. The After contains 14 color plates of Ms. Gomez stunning subarctic landscapes and other explorations using mezzotints and dry point.

Karinna Gomez is an adjunct instructor at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, where she completed her MFA in 2014. She has received several awards, including a Fulbright Fellowship to study in Iceland and a Rasmuson Foundation Individual Artist Project Award. Karinna was recently an artist-in-residence at Anderson Ranch Arts Center in Colorado and at Galleri Christensen in Kjølle ord, Norway. Her work is shown and collected nationally.

This is a rare opportunity to meet Karinna in person, look at previous work, originals from “The After”, as well as see new work. We are pleased to partner with Davidson Galleries, who represent Ms. Gomez, and are grateful that we could include her moving work in “The After”.

Wine and cheese provided.

In the Studio for “The After”

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Naomi Moon Siegel recording "The After" at Skoor Sound.

Naomi Moon Siegel recording “The After” at Skoor Sound.

Our next book was read in the studio yesterday, with the amazing Naomi Moon Siegel behind the controls and dials! We’re so excited to ship “The After” with a CD containing a song commissioned by the Syrinx Effect, a reading of the book-lenght poem by Melinda Mueller, and one additional surprise file that’s guaranteed to smash your heart to bits.

We’re finalizing production and will begin shipping “The After” at the end of September. It will make a special gift for anyone in your life with an interest in poetry and how we’re telling the story of the current mass extinction we’re responsible for.

Twelve Saints Book Cover

Twelve Saints: Book Launch

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Come eat some cake and learn more about our first book with reading by poet Knox Gardner and discussion on the collaboration with artist Nia Michaels.

We will have books for sale and plenty of coffee and cake in the intimate setting of the author’s home. Nia Michaels have a selection of her art available for purchase, including several of the Saints featured in this book.

Doors open at 7:00. Reading and discsusion at 7:30 followed by mingling and book signing from 8 pm until 9 pm.

Why We Publish Collaborations

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Fifteen years ago, as a young(er) poet, I got it into my head that I could not longer read my poems aloud unless I had a gigantic video behind me. This was all well and good, and slowly with some support from 911 Media Arts Center, I had some help making this a reality. I also, as they say, painted myself into a box, because I did not know how to to collaborate, raise money, or promote this kind of work.

Poetry is the collaboration with the world. While much of its difficult work might take place within the romanticized solitude of the author’s desk, the ability to get the work read, heard and most importantly, to occupy our shared sphere of being human, requires collaboration.

Of course, there are many well-known combinations of poets, painters and musicians responding to each other’s work, not to mention that most stubborn collaboration, the translation!  It is impossible to imagine the New York School without the painters, the Harlem Renaissance without the musicians, the Romantics without the radical press! Even our most lonely of poets, Emily Dickinson had her windows and letter campaigns.

Why is the market place so determined to present work solo. Why do we feel the need to believe that the creativity of the poet or the artist happens in isolation rather than inherently as part of a community? A community that exists not only between people expressing themselves creatively in response to the world, but the community that supports the individual artist with the mundane. Sometimes it’s nice for someone else to put on the coffee when there’s writing to be done!

In our mind, the ability to collaborate is truly the unsung skill of all successful poets and artists.

As poetry press, we have the good fortune to have our financial goal be,  “Let’s just not lose a lot of money.” (see our statement on Financial Transparency here). With that goal, we’re able to put out work in formats that financially make no sense for a press that has to pay staff salaries and support a bigger marketing efforts and other complications. It means we put out fewer books, but that we can put out books that give our poets and artists more creative freedom and the opportunity to very publicly engage with each other. It means that we can work closely with local presses to run the work, rather than sending the books to China to get printed. It means that we have a responsibility to put out work that otherwise would be too difficult to find a home for in the market as it exists.